Fuck you, Immah Dargon
So this was probably the best Jam I’ve been a part of, not only because I was able to work with four teams instead of sticking with one, but I have had great working relationships with almost everyone I’ve worked with. The game designer was kinda pushy when it comes to getting what she wants, but I sort of understand how passionate some people can be with their projects. I, along with three other jammers, reserved a room for audio only, giving the other jammers an opportunity to work with us whenever that may be.Final Wish involved James and Mathew as the music composers, and myself as the producer/audio engineer. Mat and James are not so much as perfectionists as they are wanting to get their compositions done right, but I was very patient with them, and the compositions all turned out great in my opinion. Pretty much as a producer/engineer, I need to be totally patient with the musician I’m working with, whether working with my material, or theirs. Even if they aren’t prone to making mistakes, nailing down the perfect riff measured on the perfect beat is tough, and sometimes cutting and editing the sound can’t fix it.We wrote and recorded four songs for Final Wish. They were supposed to be looped, but I didn’t have enough time to properly cut the sounds to make them seamless, so they still have a 50 millisecond delay, or they don’t loop because of a programming error.My task with Fear Itself was to master and loop the tracks Mat wrote and composed in GarageBand. He came loaded with woodwinds, which included a piccolo, a flute, an oboe, and an English horn. He also brought over his keyboard. Borrowing my microphone and Jeffery’s midi to usb adapter gave him the opportunity to work on his own, though we still goofed around when we had enough free time. He seemed to be doing fine himself, but he had to leave early for some reason, so he gave me the task to finish the tracks for them to be used in game. The two Fear tracks were supposed to be recorded out of key and off tempo to give the players an uneasy feeling and likely put them in a state of confusion.On some occasions, we would jam out on some video game soundtracks. We decided to compose a Zelda Medley and play in front of the Jammers as some sort of mini concert. t’was awesome, except I wasn’t a part of the jam, just recorded. Welp.Kitty Love and Ascension both required me to either record the sounds myself or find some online and mix them. I’ve provided the Wilhelm scream and the “YOURAARGH” scream to Kitty Love, so there’s bound to be some humorous results. I’ve also provided tutorial tips in the design for Ascension, having panels that show the players the keys to move about and look, sort of like how in Thirty Flights of Love and Gravity Bone show the actions on posters. It gave Ascension a Portal vibe to it, but the game’s character controller is kinda bad; too slippery and more often than not, you may accidentally overshoot the platforms because of a physics error.Still, this has been an awesome weekend.

So this was probably the best Jam I’ve been a part of, not only because I was able to work with four teams instead of sticking with one, but I have had great working relationships with almost everyone I’ve worked with.

The game designer was kinda pushy when it comes to getting what she wants, but I sort of understand how passionate some people can be with their projects. I, along with three other jammers, reserved a room for audio only, giving the other jammers an opportunity to work with us whenever that may be.

Final Wish involved James and Mathew as the music composers, and myself as the producer/audio engineer. Mat and James are not so much as perfectionists as they are wanting to get their compositions done right, but I was very patient with them, and the compositions all turned out great in my opinion. Pretty much as a producer/engineer, I need to be totally patient with the musician I’m working with, whether working with my material, or theirs. Even if they aren’t prone to making mistakes, nailing down the perfect riff measured on the perfect beat is tough, and sometimes cutting and editing the sound can’t fix it.

We wrote and recorded four songs for Final Wish. They were supposed to be looped, but I didn’t have enough time to properly cut the sounds to make them seamless, so they still have a 50 millisecond delay, or they don’t loop because of a programming error.

My task with Fear Itself was to master and loop the tracks Mat wrote and composed in GarageBand. He came loaded with woodwinds, which included a piccolo, a flute, an oboe, and an English horn. He also brought over his keyboard. Borrowing my microphone and Jeffery’s midi to usb adapter gave him the opportunity to work on his own, though we still goofed around when we had enough free time. He seemed to be doing fine himself, but he had to leave early for some reason, so he gave me the task to finish the tracks for them to be used in game. The two Fear tracks were supposed to be recorded out of key and off tempo to give the players an uneasy feeling and likely put them in a state of confusion.

On some occasions, we would jam out on some video game soundtracks. We decided to compose a Zelda Medley and play in front of the Jammers as some sort of mini concert. t’was awesome, except I wasn’t a part of the jam, just recorded. Welp.

Kitty Love and Ascension both required me to either record the sounds myself or find some online and mix them. I’ve provided the Wilhelm scream and the “YOURAARGH” scream to Kitty Love, so there’s bound to be some humorous results. I’ve also provided tutorial tips in the design for Ascension, having panels that show the players the keys to move about and look, sort of like how in Thirty Flights of Love and Gravity Bone show the actions on posters. It gave Ascension a Portal vibe to it, but the game’s character controller is kinda bad; too slippery and more often than not, you may accidentally overshoot the platforms because of a physics error.

Still, this has been an awesome weekend.

  1. nerdymrsimms posted this